Title

The Right to Privacy in Sandel's Procedural Republic

Author granted license

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

3-4-1999

Editor(s)

Anita L. Allen & Milton C. Regan

ISBN

9780191522369

Publisher

Oxford University Press, Incorporated

Language

en-US

Abstract

A distinguished cast of some of the world's finest political and legal theorists presents a definitive critique of Michael Sandel's widely read and hugely influential Democracy's Discontent. Sandel's liberal and feminist critics square off with his communitarian and civic republican sympathizers in a lively and wide-ranging discussion spanning constitutional law, culture, and political economy. This is essential reading for all those concerned about the future of American politics, law, and public philosophy. -;In this timely and provocative volume, some of the world's leading political and constitutional theorists come together to debate Michael Sandel's celebrated thesis that the United States is in the the grip of a flawed public philosophy - procedural liberalism. Beginning with an original stage-setting introduction by Ronald Beiner, and ending with a reply by Michael Sandel, Sandel's liberal and feminist critics square off with his communitarian and civic republican sympathizers in a lively and wide-ranging discussion spanning constitutional law, culture, and political economy. Practical, topical issues of immigration, gay marriage, federalism, adoption, abortion, corporate speech, militias, and economic disparity are debated alongside theories of civic virtue, citizenship, identity, and community. Not only does this volume provide the most comprehensive and insightful critique of Sandel's Democracy's Discontent to date - it also makes a very significant, substantive contribution to contemporary political and legal philosophy in its own right. It will prove essential reading for all those interested in the future of American politics, law, and public philosophy.

Comments

This is a book chapter written by James Fleming & Linda McClain as part of a larger volume containing many essays on politics, law, and legal/political philosophy.

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