Manuscript of Women, Church, and State: Religion and the Culture of Individual Rights in Nineteenth-Century America

Title

Book Preface

Document Type

Contents

Publication Date

1999

Abstract

At her death in December 1997, Betsy Clark had been working for more than a dozen years on a study tentatively entitled "Women, Church and State: Religion and the Culture of Individual Rights in Nineteenth-Century America." Between 1987 and 1995, several of the planned chapters had appeared in law reviews and in history journals. Another chapter had been written and revised before and during the first stages of her illness. Two chapters can be found in preliminary form in her 1989 Princeton dissertation and had been presented to a colloquium at Harvard Law School. But other chapters planned for the work were never committed to paper, in particular a chapter on notions of privacy (a pervasive feature of several of the competed [sic] chapters) and a concluding essay intended to examine both "the shift from negative and political rights claims to remedies requiring intervention or redistribution between groups of citizens . . . and . . . the relationship between the assertion of new 'rights' and remedies and the growth of state power."

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